Joseph the Carpenter

 

Image

Photo courtesy of: http://en.wikipedia.org

              Joseph the Carpenter was created by a French Baroque painter named Georges de La Tour. It is an oil painting that came to life in 1645 in Louvre, Paris. La Tour is famous for painting religious chiaroscuro scenes lit by candlelight. Joseph the Carpenter was done in tenebrism style that was very popular during the Baroque era; the painting portrays a scene of young Jesus with Saint Joseph, his earthly father. In the painting Joseph is drilling into a piece of wood with an auger which is supposed to reflect the shape of the cross; the setting of the picture is a foreshadowing of Jesus’s crucifixion. The young Jesus is depicted almost as if he is in benediction with his hand raised and the candlelight shining through his face which is seen as a symbolic reference to Jesus as the “Light of the World.”

Image

Photo courtesy of: www.art-prints-on-demand.com

           During the Baroque era the art world was changing dramatically. Artists were starting to use vivid realistic depictions of everyday life and common people in their artwork; still life and tenebrism became very popular during this time which created a dramatic focus within the art. One of the biggest influences of the Baroque era was The Council of Trent; they impacted the arts as they represented the Counter-Reformation and were organized to think up ideas to bring people back to the church. Realizing that the arts had such a huge influence on people, they decided to use art to communicate to followers the message of the church and ignite spiritual fervor.  Joseph the Carpenter is a perfect example of how The Council of Trent was trying to reach followers of the church through art. The young Jesus is sitting with Joseph in common clothes and working, with his auger, as many people understand what hard work means. The idea of showing father and son working together is a great way to help people understand the church and stories from the Bible; that even Jesus lived a simple life on earth. There is not a complex meaning behind the painting and it is not highly decorative, yet it has a simple beauty to it that is easily understood. The painting has a religious emotional appeal to it with the lighting in the picture as if it is shining through the innocence of the child and not the candle.

                Joseph the Carpenter is a beautiful piece of artwork and it illustrates the use of tenebrism perfectly. The creative meaning behind the picture brings to life stories and ideals from the Bible. La Tour did a great job of showing the companionship that one can imagine that Joseph and Jesus had as shown in this picture of them working together. There are many things that can bring a Father and son together; a son learning the crafts of his father is a great way. That is exactly what I believe La Tour was trying to do, aside from the other meanings, to show the bond of father and son.

Comparing Renaissance and Baroque Art

Image

Photo courtesy of: http://en.wikipedia.org

          During the Renaissance a Flemish painter, named Pieter Bruegel, produced a very complex painting in 1562 called, The Fall of Rebel Angels. The painting is to depict the book of Revelations from the Bible; he did so in a very unusual style with the angels being half-human and half-animal monsters. The picture is very chaotic and difficult to understand; at first glance many people may not relate it to the Bible. The Fall of the Rebel Angels was done in mannerism style, with many allegories which were only understood by the educated elite of the time. As the Reformation was unfolding during the Renaissance many artists were turning away from the church and rebelling by creating more secular artwork, as you can see very clearly in Bruegel’s, The Fall of the Rebel Angels.

          Joseph the Carpenter shows the essence of the Baroque era as artists moved away from mannerism styles and created artwork that everyone could understand and relate to. The artwork in the Baroque era was much more theatrical with vivid realistic depictions of everyday life. They used tenebrism to show sharp contrasts within the pictures of people in their common lives. The Counter-Reformation during the Baroque era had a huge role in this because they wanted to use art to bring people back to the church so the art needed to be understood by everybody. They used art to tell stories from the Bible that people could relate to and would show the men and women of the Bible as heroes or as people to look up to. The church was trying to ignite spiritual fervor in the hearts of its followers and so was born the new styles of artwork.

References

Lubbock, Tom. Bruegel, Pieter: The Fall Of The Rebel Angels (1562). The Independent, 2008. Web. 25 Feb. 2014. http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/great-works/bruegel-pieter-the-fall-of-the-rebel-angels-1562-897006.html

Trueman, Chris. The Council of Trent. N.p, 2013. Web. 25 Feb. 2014. http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/council-of-trent.htm

Wikipedia. Georges de La Tour. N.p, 2014. Web. 25 Feb. 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_de_La_Tour

Wikipedia. Joseph the Carpenter. N.p., 2014. Web. 25 Feb. 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_the_Carpenter

Wikipedia. The Fall of the Rebel Angels. N.p, 2014. Web. 25 Feb. 2014 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fall_of_the_Rebel_Angels_(Bruegel)

Wisse, Jacob. Pieter Bruegel the Elder (ca. 1525–1569). The Metropolitan of Museum of Art, 2013. Web. 25 Feb. 2014. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/brue/hd_brue.htm

Chateau de Chambord: Humanism in Architecture

 

Image

Photo courtesy of : http://wallpapersinhq.com

Located in France, the Chateau de Chambord is the largest castle in the Loire Valley. This building is one of the most recognized estates in the world because of its French Renaissance architecture. With over 400 rooms, 282 fireplaces, and more than 70 staircases this massive estate is remarkable. King Francois I commissioned the construction to Francois Dombriant to begin building on 6 September 1519. It was to be built as a hunting lodge for King Francois I. The construction of the building lasted many years; it was altered several times and never finished. It is said that Domenico da Cortona was the architect of Chateau de Chambord, but there are many controversies surrounding who the architect really was. Some believe that Leonardo da Vinci may have been the designer because of the double helix staircase that is the centerpiece of the building and the extraordinary architecture found throughout. Chambord was once abandoned for a great deal of time, but it has been renovated and is now open to the public.

Image

Photo courtesy of: http://loire-chateaux.co.uk

Image

Photo courtesy of http://thefabweb.com

          The construction of the Chateau de Chambord was greatly influenced by the rise of humanism. The estate was built with Renaissance elegance; the center layout was as an early example of the French and Italian style of grouping rooms into self-contained suites. As humanism extended into the Northern Renaissance many of the construction methods of estates changed, taking on styles with symmetry, geometry, and orderly arrangements. The castles became lighter, more delicate, and were built with more windows. Chambord had many open windows, a loggia, and a vast outdoor area at the top which before had only been seen in Italy; these things were not very practical for cold and damp Northern France. The layout of the estate was very geometric, with a central body that had square lines in the shape of a Greek cross. With shelf motifs and inlaid marble panels that were mostly seen in Italy, Chambord was classic humanism at its best.  Castle enthusiast Jean-Baptiste Lully understands the beauty of the estate, he wrote that the Chateau de Chambord “appears suddenly at the edge of a path and the sight of its white massive structure that widens and takes shape little by little, produces a dramatic impression, which is even more striking at sunset”, in The Castel of Chambord.

The longing for something new and fresh like humanism during the Renaissance is something that I greatly admire from the artists and designers of that time. It is amazing to me that many of these estates were only used as hunting lodges or to entertain a few weeks out of the year; the royalty truly lived a different lifestyle enveloped with luxury. I have always been into architecture and seeing these beautiful castles has really made me want to go see them. I think they are an incredible part of the Renaissance history and it makes me happy to know that, still today, anyone is able to enjoy seeing these incredible works.

Image

Photo courtesy of: http://www.gerpho.com

References

Château de Chambord. Spotting History, 2014. Web. 14 Feb. 2014. http://thefabweb.com/86381/24-best-architecture-pictures-of-the-month-march-16th-to-april-14th-2013/

Chateau de Chambord. Wikipedia, 15 Jan. 2014. Web. 14 Feb. 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chambord

Lully, Jean-Baptiste. The Castel of Chambord. 37-Online, 2014. Web. 14 Feb. 2014. http://www.37-online.net/gb/castles/chambord_gb.php

Renaissance architecture. Wikipedia, 7 Feb. 2014. Web. 14 Feb. 2014 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance_architecture

Sullivan, Mary Ann. Château de Chambord. N.p., 2009. Web. 14 Feb. 2014. http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/france/loire/chambord/chambord1.html